Monthly Archives: June 2016

Finances, Relationships, and Health

Finances, Relationships, and Health

downloadThree life areas are critical to building success: Finances, relationships, and health. Following are ideas concerning building success in these critical areas.

Finances: Put aside ten percent of your monthly income into a savings account. This will help you manage the finances part of finances, relationships, and health. Set up a special account for the purchase of your next car. Once a car is paid off, put the amount that you paid monthly on that car in your account. Don’t wait until the end of the month to save that ten percent. Saving at the beginning of the month will force you to cut back on spending.

Relationships; Learn to incorporate active listening in your relationships. Exercise the value of compassion and empathy. Finances, relationships, and health can all be sources of great happiness or great stress. Success can be impeded when money is scarce, when relationships are strained, and when health is poor. learn to incorporate active listening in your relationships. There’s a great deal of validation when one’s views are heard.

Health: Take time for daily exercise. Be sure to have a diet that is rich in alkalizing foods. Take probiotics daily and be sure to include a variety of vegetables in your diet.
The greater part of your diet should be vegetables, followed by fruits and small amounts of protein. Be sure to eat three to four servings of fish per week.

Set aside daily time for tai chi. Tai chi helps build chi energy, which is important in maintaining health.

Finances, relationship, and health are all critical when in the process of building success. Poor people skills can impede the ability to get along with co-workers. Financial insecurity can spill over to work situations, and poor health can interrupt every area of life.

Secure your finances, take care of your relationships, and build your health. All are important in building success. It’s hard to be successful when money is scarce, when relationships are draining, and when health is challenging.

Be sure to incorporate some weight building exercises two or three times a week. This will strengthen muscles and bones.

Eliminate all sugar, all gluten, and all dairy. Your body will say thank you for this.

Self care in all three areas is important in creating a life of happiness, joy, and fulfillment.

Take care of your finances, relationships, and health. Life fulfillment will be guaranteed.

I will sign off for now. I have some tai chi to do.

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Building Health

Building Health

downloadIt’s difficult to build success when health is an issue. Building health is a prerequisite for building success. I would like to pass along the health secrets I have learned over my seventy-two years.

Diet: Foods to eat in abundance:

Vegetables: Eat kale, mustard greens, bok choy, and spinach. All four are alkalizing to the body. An alkaline body cannot harbor infections. All four should be a big part of your health building routine. The taste buds can be re-educated to include the savory flavors of vegetables. I used to be partial to anything sweet. Now I lean toward the veggies when it comes to taste.

Make at least fifty percent of your food raw. Raw foods contain all the enzymes we need to digest foods properly. Some practitioners recommend an all raw food diet. I tried this for four years with disastrous results. All raw foods can be extremely hard on the digestive tract. It’s better to lightly steam your foods.

Proteins: Protein servings should be no greater than the palm of your hand. Vegetable servings should be two palm servings. Carbohydrates should consist of one palm serving. So use your had to measure portion sizes.

Foods to avoid: Avoid all sugar and gluten. Both seriously depress the immune system. Evidence points to a relationship between excessive sugar and gluten consumption and mental illness.

Drinks to avoid: Leave alcohol and dairy alone. Raw dairy can be consumed in moderation. Alcohol should be removed entirely from anyone’s routine. Alcohol kills, plain and simple. Building health involves eliminating it altogether.

Drink at least eight glasses of water daily. Coffee can be consumed in moderation if it is organic.

Do some form of exercise at least four times a week. I find walking and tai chi to be the most beneficial.

Eliminate all artificial sweeteners. They are all neurotoxins, Stevia can be used in moderation.

Maintain a healthy attitude. Set daily intentions, do daily spiritual reading, and incorporate daily prayer into your routine. All are integral parts of building health.

Keep your body in an alkaline environment. An acidic body cannot be healthy. Alkaline foods include all vegetables, avocados, lemons, and tomatoes. Acidic foods include all meats, poultry, nuts, and seeds

Finally, never consume iced drinks or foods. They shock the stomach, the lungs, and the throat. Keep everything warm. The body thrives on warmth and dies on cold. Cold foods like watermelon can be consumed in moderation during the summer months.

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Healthy Oils to Compliment Your Lifestyle

Healthy Oils to Compliment Your Lifestyle

download-1Choosing to live a healthy and holistic lifestyle has never been easier. We have all seen the energetic rise in superfoods; from super berries, raw cocoa to matcha tea. Many health conscious consumers spend time seeking out the next health food, eager to see if it has the power to compliment our healthy lifestyles.

Healthy oils have recently been in the superfoods spotlight, with their endless benefits and versatility whats not to love? All hail the healthy oil revolution! In a world of choice how do we make the decision on what type we want to introduce and accept into our healthy food repertoire?

Most share similar benefits for optimising health, but each come into their own when used in different ways. Some healthy oils simply offer distinctive flavours making them ideal to use as salad dressings or sautéing food; Walnut, hemp and almond to name a few.

Naturally some are better for cooking than others. Selecting an oil that can hold a high cooking heat, often known as ‘smoking point’ is the key to cooking. Olive, avocado and organic virgin coconut oil can all be used for cooking. You may choose to embrace a few varieties into your kitchen cupboards as each offer a different usage and flavour.

When it comes to cooking organic virgin coconut oil is the winning choice, with over 90% of its fat being saturated it is naturally resistant to high heat. It is packed full of powerful health benefits, naturally high in Lauric acid believed to lower cholesterol as well as being packed full of antibacterial qualities and due to its nutritious qualities it can boost metabolism.

If you are not keen on coconut flavour, you can source odourless, still reaping all its health benefits without compromising on taste. However if the taste excites your tastebuds it really can lift a basic recipe, delicious vegetables suddenly take on a smoother and richer flavour.

Why choose ‘organic virgin coconut oil’? It simply means it has been extracted in two ways, via extraction from fresh undried coconut meat or extracted from pre dried meat. Both natural processes offer a ‘less processed’ product. Antioxidants are much higher in organic virgin varieties, increased antioxidants mean extra nourishment for our cells to absorb and benefit from.

Coconut oil is not just for your kitchen cupboard. With over 100 known uses, it does not just have to sit in your kitchen cupboard. It can be used as a moisturiser for both hair and skin, soothes cuts and grazes or use it to create your own natural deodorant. A true superfood and a trusted diverse health companion.

Lets not forget our other healthy cooking companion! The new kid on the block, Avocado also holds a high cooking heat and can be used liberally to compliment salads or simply drizzled over bread as a quick healthy snack.

This tasty alternative is a friendly carrier for other flavours, its subtle taste make it a great partner for a range of food. A great source of Vitamin E, an avid promoter of healthy skin and hair and natural appetite suppressant, avocado oil should hold a place in your healthy cupboard.

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Respiratory Anatomy and Physiology

Respiratory Anatomy and Physiology

The respiratory system is in place to extract Oxygen (O2) from the atmosphere and get rid of Carbon Dioxide (CO2). O2 is used in chemical reactions by the cells to create energy for use in their metabolic activities, CO2 is usually a waste product created from these reactions.

The respiratory system can often be segmented into the ‘upper respiratory tract’ and the ‘lower respiratory tract’. Upper consists of the nose, the pharynx, and the larynx.

The nose and nasal cavity are used as a main source of air entry and are lined with columnar cells (ciliated columnar epithelium) which contain mucus secreting goblet cells. At the anterior of the nose there are also nasal hairs. Within the nasal cavity, conchae exist to increase surface area and cause a turbulence effect for air passing through. The respiratory function of the nose is to warm the air (which is done by the increased vascularity of the nose which explains the potential large blood loss during epistaxis), and to clean and humidify it (which is done through mucus coated nasal hairs trapping dirt and moist mucosa humidifying the air).

The pharynx follows in the next step of the upper respiratory tract. The pharynx begins at the end of the nasal cavity (nasopharynx), extends past the back of the mouth and tongue (oropharynx), and finishes at the larynx and oesophagus (laryngopharynx). The walls of the pharynx contain mucous membrane lining, submucosa, and smooth muscle. The respiratory functions for the pharynx include passage of air, warming and humidifying of air (done through the vascularity of the walls and moist mucosa), protection from pathogens (bacteria etc. through the placement of the tonsils and lymphatic tissue), and assistance in speech (through acting as a resonating chamber for sound).

The last of the upper respiratory tract ends with the larynx (voice box). The larynx is mainly made up from cartilage, dividing into 4 main structures: the thyroid cartilage, the cricoid cartilage, the arytenoid cartilage, and the epiglottis. The thyroid, cricoid and arytenoid are made up from hyaline cartilage, and the epiglottis is made up from elastic fibrocartilage. In-between the arytenoid cartilage are the vocal cords and entrance to the trachea. The respiratory functions of the larynx are to protect the lower respiratory tract (through the epiglottis blocking the passage of food into the trachea whilst eating and swallowing), to humidify and warm the air (through the moist mucosa and vascularity of the walls), and to produce speech and sound (through the use of the vocal cords).

The lower respiratory tract consists of the trachea, the lungs, the bronchi and bronchioles, the respiratory bronchioles and alveoli.

The trachea begins the lower respiratory tract anatomy, consisting of 16 to 20 incomplete ‘C’ shaped hyaline cartilage rings atop of each other. There are three layers of tissue which enclose the trachea and cartilaginous rings; the outer consists of fibrous and elastic tissue which enclose the cartilage. The middle consists of the cartilage and smooth muscle that wraps around the trachea. The inner layer is lined with columnar cells (epithelium) which contain mucus secreting goblet cells. The respiratory functions of the trachea are to warm and humidify air, to expel mucus with unwanted particles and dust (through cilia on the inner lining cells wafting mucus upwards towards the larynx where it can be either swallowed or coughed up), to provide a cough reflex (nerve endings in the larynx, trachea, and bronchi stimulate a cough reflex when irritated), and provide support and patency to the airway (through the C-shaped cartilage providing support to keep the airway open but also allow flexibility for movement and swallowing food).

The lungs are the organs which contain the further lower respiratory tract, and assist in the inspiration and expiration of air. The left lung consists of a superior and inferior lobe, the right consists of a superior, middle, and inferior lobe. The pulmonary artery, veins, and left and right bronchus enter the lungs through the hilum. Surrounding the lungs are the pleura and pleural cavity; visceral pleura coats the outside of the lungs, parietal pleura coats the inside of the chest wall and thoracic surface of the diaphragm, and the pleural cavity is the space between which contains no air, only a thin film of serous fluid. With the pleura in place the surfaces can glide over each other easily and can only be pulled apart with great difficulty. With the expansion of the chest wall and diaphragm during inspiration, atmospheric pressure within the lungs drop and air floods in to stabilize the level to normal. On relaxation of the chest the pressure increases and air is forced out.

The bronchi stem from the trachea acting as openings for air into the lungs. The left bronchus is about 5cm long and narrow, whereas the right is 2.5cm long and wider. The bronchi (more cartilaginous in structure) further expand and branch off into bronchioles (which are less cartilaginous and more smooth muscle and epithelial). The bronchioles further lead on to the end of the lower respiratory tract where the gaseous exchange can take place. Further down the bronchioles, ciliated epithelium are replaced with non-ciliated epithelium and mucus secreting goblet cells disappear. The respiratory functions of the bronchioles are to regulate the control of air entry (through contraction or relaxation of smooth muscle in the walls), and provide warming and humidifying to the air.

The bronchioles divide further into smaller respiratory bronchioles and end with the alveoli. These are thin membrane pockets (or sacks) which are surrounded by capillaries and supported by elastic fibres. Gaseous exchange happens between the membrane wall of the alveoli and capillary, which are fused firmly together and known as the respiratory membrane. Septal cells lying between the squamous cells of the alveoli secrete surfactant which prevents the alveoli from drying out. There are about 150 million alveoli in the adult lung which provide gaseous exchange. The respiratory functions of the alveoli are to provide the centre of gaseous exchange between O2 and CO2.

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